STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS: CFQ Spotlight Podcast 4:20

Chris Pine (right) and Zachary Quinto (left) have nemesis Benedict Cumberbatch at their mercy (don't kid yourself) in STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS.
Chris Pine (right) and Zachary Quinto (left) have nemesis Benedict Cumberbatch at their mercy (don't kid yourself) in STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS.

STAR TREK is back, Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) is still flouting the rules, director J.J. Abrams is still dividing the fan base, but amazingly, inconceivably, there’s no dissent within the Cinefantastique Online ranks this time: Steve Biodrowski, Lawrence French, and Dan Persons all agree that STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS is supreme, quintessential TREK adventure. Telling the tale of the Enterprise’s encounter with a diabolical mastermind (Benedict Cumberbatch), the film at once delivers the big-scale action (even better in IMAX 3D) that audiences have come to expect from a major studio tent pole release while honoring the ideals that made creator Gene Roddenberry’s optimistic vision of the future so compelling.
Come join Steve, Larry, and Dan as they delve deep into this top-notch entry to the TREK franchise, exploring what makes it both a superior entertainment and a worthy elaboration of Roddenberry’s humanistic vision. Plus: What’s coming to theaters next week.

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'Trek 2' Getting Re-writes

Spock_CharacterPoster_72DPIIn response to Zachary Quinto’s( Mr. Spock) recent comment that the script to the currently filming STAR TREK sequel is still undergoing rewrites, co-writer Roberto Orci told TrekMovie.com

“…you should know the story hasn’t change(d), the structure hasn’t changed, and the action sequences haven’t changed. Most changes are minor.
The changes I suspect Quinto is referring to are the character interactions as we fine tune the level of their various friendships. How well they all know each other and what they’ve all been through off screen is a nuanced yet essential part of the actors understanding where they are coming from with each other. While discussing the exact same plot elements, what they’ve been through colors their attitude toward each other.
And given that the time past (sic) in real life is different than the amount of time passed in the movie world, it takes a polish to get it just right. That’s what polishes (a legal contractual word in our contract) are for.
Does any of this mean the movie will be any good? No. But if it’s no good, it will be because we were wrong to execute exactly what we wanted. Not because we changed our minds or someone changed our minds for us. “

See the much longer comments at the link above, where Orci adds that some slight revisions are also necessary to accomodate changes in setting as director JJ Abrambs explores new equipment allowing greater camera movement, presumably within and between sets.  All this must of course be documented and reflected in the script on any complex production.
Nearly all films require some on-going rewrites during production  to allow for directors’ decisions, ideas generated by actor improvisations,  location opportunities, etc.