Attack of the Crab Monsters – Bad Movie Podcast

Break out the nutcrackers, ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS means we feast tonight!
Break out the nutcrackers, ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS means we feast tonight!

I for one welcome our crustacean overlords.
Even if you’ve never seen ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS, you probably still know it by heart. It is the perfect model of the drive-in B-movie, a sublime mix of papier-mache creatures, suggestive sexuality, and dodgy science, with just a bit of cold-war philosophy thrown in for tang. This is one of Roger Corman’s earliest films, and despite the bare-bones budget and having the ever-pressing theme of identity loss being delivered via the medium of giant, telepathic crabs with big, googly eyes, the master of the B’s makes the experience sixty minutes of pure hoot.
The Temple of Bad team of Andrea Lipinski, Kevin Lauderdale, Orenthal Hawkins, and Dan Persons welcome their special guest, Cinefantastique Online’s Steve Biodrowski, to giggle along at the silliness, praise the kind of good-bad film that’s all too rare but always welcome, and make far too many references to drawn butter. Click on the player to hear the show.

Public Domain Pandemonium I: Lady Frankenstein; The Terror; Sita Sings the Blues – CFQ Spotlight Podcast 3:8

Free at Last, Free at Last: From left to right: SITA SINGS THE BLUES; LADY FRANKENSTEIN; and THE TERROR
Free at Last, Free at Last: From left to right: SITA SINGS THE BLUES; LADY FRANKENSTEIN; and THE TERROR

The universe of the genre film is filled with many strange and wonderful things: heroes; demons, attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion (oh, Roy Batty, we miss you). But nothing is so strange or, at times, wonderful as the sight of movies that, by accident or design, have fallen out of copyright and are now subject to the random winds of distribution. They’re copied and recopied, cut and redubbed, posted in versions of varying quality on YouTube, all quite legally and for absolutely no money.

In other words: You ever wonder from whence came those films on that 1000 SCI-FI CLASSICS! DVD set that you bought on Amazon for $2.99 in order to bring your $22.01 order up to the $25 needed for free shipping? Now you know.

So, in the absence of a new theatrical release this week, we here at the Cinefantastique Spotlight are debuting our first “Public Domain Pandemonium,” where each of us offers for discussion a movie readily available on the web and elsewhere. Steve Biodrowski gives us his take on giddily nude horror film LADY FRANKENSTEIN; Lawrence French talks about Roger Corman’s let’s-burn-off-Karloff’s-contract-and-these-two-remaining-days-we-have-on-the-castle-set “classic,” THE TERROR; and Dan Persons talks about the unusual, Creative Commons animated musical-fantasy, SITA SINGS THE BLUES. A trio of fun films, all available by clicking the links above. And all for free! Ya cheapskate.

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