Hatchet III review

HTC_Poster_lowIf you’re a card-carrying soldier in the self-proclaimed “Hatchet Army,” you already know whether you want to see this movie; in fact, you probably already have seen this move. But if you never enlisted, or if you took an honorable discharge after HATCHET II, you may be sitting on the sidelines and wondering whether to take another tour of duty around the swamp haunted by Victor Crowley (Kane Hodder). Well, as someone who defected because of the disappointing sequel,* I can say it’s time to rejoin the ranks. HATCHET III is almost as much gleefully gory fun as the original – a comedy-horror hybrid that elicits screams of laughter and disgust in equal measure, sometimes simultaneously.
Like HATCHET II (2010), HATCHET III is pitched to the fans who discovered the franchise with the original HATCHET (2006) – a came-out-of-nowhere sleeper hit on the festival circuit that never reached the wider audience it deserved. The problem with HATCHET II is that writer-director Adam Green over-enthusiastically pandered to the gore-hounds who loved the unrated mayhem the first time around; in the process, the delightfully tongue-in-cheek tone of the original degraded into dispiriting camp. HATCHET III ditches the camp and resurrects the clever comedy, adding numerous nods and winks that will only be recognized by those who have seen the previous films.**

Caroline Williams and Kane Hodder
Caroline Williams and Kane Hodder

Though directed this time by B.J. McConnell (Green is back as writer and producer), HATCHET III picks up seamlessly from its predecessor, with Marybeth (Danielle Harris) punching Victor Crowley’s ticket and marching into the local police station with his scalp. Unfortunately, Crowley is no mere madman but some kind of eternally resurrecting monster, who is soon decimating the crews sent to tag the bodies leftover from the previous films. A local reporter (Caroline Williams), who destroyed her reputation by hyping the legend of Victor Crowley legend, knows a way to end the curse (which has nothing to do with the method in HATCHET II – but who’s keeping track?) Reluctantly, Marybeth agrees to help; her family connection with one of the men responsible for Crowley’s death – and thus his afterlife – makes her the only one who return Crowley to the peace of the grave.
Unlike the previous sequel, HATCHET III avoids getting bogged down in back story, and script doesn’t waste a lot of time getting another crowd of victims into the swamp.  Once all the fish are in the barrel, director McDonnell keeps the action popping like a series of burst blood vessels as Crowley dissects his victims in a series of imaginatively gruesome ways.
If that sounds a little too hardcore for viewers with little thirst for movie blood, take note: the copious carnage is too outrageous to be regarded seriously; the aesthetic of violence is almost diametrically opposed to that of the recent V/H/S 2, whose crimson splatter paints a picture far more grim and depressing. Achieved with old-fashioned prosthetics and geysers of red-tinted water, the kills in HATCHET III are scary fun in a popcorn-movie kind of way that seems almost quaint in this era of torture porn and mumblegore.
Sheriff versus SWAT: Zach Galligan yields jurisdiction to Derek Mears without so much as a wimper.
Sheriff versus SWAT: Zach Galligan yields jurisdiction to Derek Mears without so much as a wimper.

At times, the script is a little too lackadaisical in its “only a movie” approach. Green’s script cannot decide whether local law enforcement is a police department or a sheriff’s department (there is a difference), and the question of jurisdictional authority is ignored when a SWAT team (led by Derek Mears as Hawes) shows up and takes over.
We’re simply not supposed to care, because we all know the real reason for the SWAT team’s presence is to shoe-horn Mears into the movie. The actor played Jason Voorhees in the recent remake of FRIDAY THE 13TH (200) – a role that Hodder played several times in the 1990s – and you can bet that HATCHET III will serve up a scene in which the two former Jasons go mano-a-mano. Unfortunately, the result turns out to be an even bigger anticlimax than the confrontation between Hodder and former Leatherface R.A. Mihailoff in HATCHER II.
Performances are mostly good, but variable. Galligan turns out to be a capable character actor, and it’s nice to see Williams (of THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE 2) on screen again, but some of the comic relief supporting players are stiff (every horror film needs its Private Hudson, but not every actor can pull it off like Bill Paxton in ALIENS).
Marybeth (Danielle Harris) faces off with Victor Crowley once again.
Marybeth (Danielle Harris) faces off with Victor Crowley once again.

As for the returning cast: Playing his third character in three films, Parry Shen regains some of the humor he lost in Part 2. With no more of the previous films’ flashbacks, Hodder’s dual role (as Victor Crowley and Victor’s grieving father) has been reduced to one; fortunately, no one can project aggressive body language through layers of makeup better than Hodder. As returning heroine Marybeth, Harris is a bit one-note, but the script gives her only one note to play (essentially, “f-ck you!”). At least Green avoids inserting the ostentatiously “dramatic” scenes from HATCHET II, which pushed Harris and Hodder beyond the limits of what they could achieve within the context of a genre film (no amount of emoting can sell emotions in a film that achieves coitus interruptus by means of decapitation).
HATCHET III manages to deliver another rousing finale that at least seems to break with tradition by offering an apparently definitive death for its mon-star. But that’s the nice thing about the film: along with the expected genre elements, there are a few surprises, too – a “dead meat” character who survives, a death that takes place mostly off-screen (leaving the violence if not the outcome in our imagination). The film may not win many new converts to the Hatchet Army, but it should bring back any troops who went AWOL.
[rating=3]
On the CFQ Review Scale of zero to five stars, a moderate recommendation

CLICK HERE TO RENT ONLINE
CLICK HERE TO RENT ONLINE

Note: HATCHET III is currently in limited theatrical engagements around the country. The film is simultaneously available via Video on Demand. Click here to rent it now.
FOOTNOTES:
*As far as I’m concerned, HATCHET II is a dishonorable discharge – of putrescent decay.
**In case your memory is a little fuzzy, here is a sampler of inside jokes in HATCHER III:

  • After playing victims in the first two films, Parry Shen appears as yet a third character, who objects to a crime-scene co-worker’s suggestion that he resembles one of the bodies  (“All Asians look alike to you!). Meanwhile, we in the audience wonder whether Shen will go zero-for-three in the survival department.
  • A brief, hysterical cameo by David Joel Moore finally ties up the loose end of what happens to Ben after the abrupt ending of HATCHET.
  • In a truly great meta-moment, the local sheriff dismisses an account of the events of the first two film for being illogical, incredible, and inconsistent, while a local drunk (played by screenwriter Green, with a look of dismay) listens  from an adjoining cell. The sequence is even funnier when you note that the sheriff is played by Zach Galligan, who appeared GREMLINS and GREMLINS 2; in the later, his character’s attempt to explain the events of the former met with similar ridicule from skeptical listeners.

Kane Hodder as Victor Crowely
Kane Hodder as Victor Crowely

HATCHET III (Dark Sky Films: theatrical and Video on Demand release on June 14, 2013). Written by Adam Green. Directed by B.J. McDonnell. Cast: Danielle Harris, Kane Hodder, Zach Galligan, Caroline Williams, Cody Blue Snider, Derek Mears, Robert Diago DoQui, Parry Shen, Sid Haig.

Hatchet III in theatres and on VOD June 14

Dark Sky Films gives limited theatrical exposure, concurrent with a Video on Demand, to this sequel from Ariescope. Adam Green, creator of the franchise, is back as writer-producer, but this time he has handed the directorial reigns over to BJ McDonell. The cast includes Danielle Harris (HALLOWEEN 4 and 5) as Marybeth and Kane Hodder (Jason in FRIDAY THE 13TH VII, etc) as Victor Crowley, along with Zach Galligan (GREMLINS), Caroline Williams (THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE 2), and Derek Mears (Jason in the remake of FRIDAY THE 13TH).
HATCHET III makes its premiere in Hollywood at the Egyptian Theatre on June 11, with cast and crew in attendance. Theatrical engagements being on June 14 in New York, Los Angeles, Denver, Columbus, and Kansas City.

HTC_Poster_low

Danielle Harris
Danielle Harris

Caroline Williams and Kane Hodder
Caroline Williams and Kane Hodder

HTC_Image_01_low
Derek Mears

Hatchet II Q&A with Adam Green

Writer-director Adam Green answers questions after the Hollywood premiere of HATCHET II at the American Cinematheque’s Egyptian Theatre, on September 30, 2010. Members of the cast and crew are also on view, including Danielle Harris (HALLOWEEN IV), Kane Hodder (FRIDAY THE 13TH, PART VII: THE NEW BLOOD), Tony Todd (CANDYMAN), and Tom Holland (director of FRIGHT NIGHT).
See a larger version of the video embedded below.

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Hatchet II review

Hatchet II posterAlthough clearly inspired by ’80s slasher movies, HATCHET had enough going for it to appeal to horror fans interested in something more than just creative kills. Sadly, HATCHET II delivers little of interest to anyone but gore-hounds. Yes, it should appeal to fans of the original- the self-proclaimed “Hatchet Army” – but HATCHET II falls prey to a problem that typically plagues sequels: it’s not just more of the same; it’s way more of the same, as if more and bloodier kills are all that were needed – forget about the clever humor and aura of mystery that made the gore in the first HATCHET feel like part of a really good, fun horror movie. “Hold on to all of your pieces,” warns the poster tagline, and it might just as well be directorial advice to the editor: HATCHET II is little more than a series of splatter effects set-pieces held together loosely, if at all, by the screenplay.
HATCHET II gets off to a decent start, picking up literally where the last frame of HATCHET  left off, as Marybeth (now played by Danielle Harris) escapes from Victor Crowley and finds shelter in the cabin of Jack Cracker (John Carl Buechler, who did the makeup in the previous film). There’s a good disgusting joke regarding a drink container that fans of the first film will recognize, and there is an equally funny bit with Jack thinking he has found the mother lode: a video camera with a “Girls Gone Wild” type recording – only to be sorely disappointed when the girls (Mercedes McNab and Joleigh Fioravanti, returning in cameos) are too busy insulting each other to disrobe.
Things go almost immediately downhill, however, when Victor Crowley predictably shows up to dispatch Jack. Killing off a returning character is an overly familiar cliche, and HATCHET II does nothing amusing or unexpected with it (unlike HATCHET, which played with our expectations that the white guy’s black buddy would be the first to go). Instead, we get an overly protracted gore scene in which Crowley disembowels Cracker, who miraculously does not die but instead runs away – until he comes to the end of his rope – er, intenstines – at which point Crowley uses said intestines to slowly pulls Cracker back across the floor before delivering the coup de grace.

Please, sir, may I have another - I'm not dead yet!
Please, sir, may I have another - I'm not dead yet!

The scene establishes the formula that will be repeated almost without variation throughout the rest of HATCHET II: Something bloody will happen, but the victim will not die, giving Crowley time to inflict more damage, and he will take his own sweet time about it. The promotional campaign is breathlessly touting that HATCHET II is being released “uncut and unrated.” At times like these, it feels un-edited as well, as if every possible frame were included. Consequently, the rhythm of the kill scenes is off; they don’t build so much as drag on. With the victim’s fate sealed, there is no suspense, only a vague curiosity about just how long the torture will be extended – usually well past the point when all but the most hardcore horror hounds will have lost interest.

PLOT

As for the story and characters – well, there ain’t none, at least not much. There is a back story, explaining the origin of Victor Crowley, but it is delivered in an unimaginative way: a lengthy flashback with voice over. It’s a long piece of exposition that comes too early in the film, slowing things down instead of doing what a sequel can do best: hit the ground running, on the foundation laid by its predecessor.
The flashback does tie up some loose ends from HATCHET, but most of it relating to Crowley’s birth- which involves infidelity and a curse – does nothing to affect the events that follow. It also dispels some of the mystery surrounding the character. One of the interesting elements of the first film was that Crowley was the subject of conflicting legends: was he dead or a live? a serial killer, a zombie, or a ghost?

Marybeth, now played by Danielle Harris
Marybeth, now played by Danielle Harris

Once the back story is out of the way, HATCHET II finally gets started, sort of. Marybeth wants to go back into the swamp to retrieve the bodies of her dead brother and father, so she enlists the aid of Reverend Zombie (Tony Todd), who has his own reasons for wanting to be rid of Crowley (Crowley is bad for the tourism business). We get an extended sequence of the Reverend enlisting a posse of sorts to go into the swamp and take out the rampaging killer, a scene padded with shots of the camera slowly panning across anonymous faces in the crowd. (Judging from the response at the cast and crew screening, this was a chance to give cameos to everyone who worked on the film.)
Around about this time, you know that HATCHET II is in serious trouble. The script is filled with obligatory lip service dialogue to explain why characters do things we never believe they would do; we’re simply supposed to accept the behavior because how else are we going to get a dozen more victims into Crowley’s path? Marybeth will not go to the police. The victim’s from the first film will have no one else looking for them who would go to the police. Marybeth will hook up with Reverend Zombie even though he is not particularly trustworthy. Her uncle will go along for the ride against his better judgement. Reverend Zombie will hire lots of hunters because he wants safety in numbers, but when in the danger zone, he will split the group up, thus undermining the safety that comes from large numbers. Lots of other people will follow him into the swamp, hoping to claim the bounty on Crowley’s head, even though most of them don’t believe Crowley exists. (Boy, are they in for a rude awakening!)
hatchet 2
There's safety in numbers - let's split up!

Even with all the set-up, there is ultimately not much to do once the posse gets into the swamp. There is a connection between Marybeth and Crowley, but it is never exploited. Although Marybeth should be the lead character, she is sidelined while we watch the newbies killed off one by one. Reverend Zombie turns out to be the prime mover, more or less leading the lambs to slaughter, believing that when Crowley has sated his thirst for revenge, he will finally stop terrorizing the swamp.
Unfortunately, this last plot thread leads to the all-time worst twist ending. The Reverend – who knows precise details about events that took place outside his personal knowledge – is surprisingly ignorant about crucial details that should be within his personal reach (like the name of his late friend’s brother). Even worse, Marybeth, who is aware of Zombie’s error, keeps her mouth shut until it’s too late to save anybody, springing her revelation like a trump card after the damage has been done.

CHARACTERS & PERFORMANCES

One of the great things about HATCHET was that the characters were engaging; even when we knew that the rules of the genre marked them as archetypal victims (e.g., the Jerk), we were sorry to see them go. As much as the film was based on a gore aesthetic, it still maintained suspense, presenting its kills in a manner designed to provoke screams of fear, not shouts of approval.
HATCHET II, conversely, gives us generic victims whose deaths never register as anything more than bodies to be battered bloody, and the cast does little to bring them to life before their unexpectedly untimely deaths. Even Parry Shen, who was so funny the first time out, seems completely stumped by his obligatory role (as the twin brother, of course), which requires him to perform a variation on his previous routine (speaking with affected accents that do not match his Asian appearance). What was funny once, provokes only exasperated sighs the second time.
Kane Hodder is back as Victor Crowley and (in flashback) Victor’s father. Although he pulled off a nice dramatic moment or two in HATCHET, here he is pushed too far by writer-director Adam Green, and the emotions start to feel forced and melodramatic – a director indulging his star at the expense of the film.
If you wonder why I’m blaming Green for Hodder’s performance, the reason is that something similar happens with Danielle Harris, when she is called upon to express grief. Harris is cute and feisty, but the script doesn’t know what to do with her: is she an emotional wreck or a righteous avenger? Also, she seems less authentic than Tamara Feldman did in HATCHET; there is something a bit too glamorous and “Hollywood” about Harris for us to accept her as the daughter of a local gator-poacher. Her presence is really a sop to the horror fans, who remember her from HALLOWEEN IV and the 2007 HALLOWEEN remake.
Tom Holland seems to be around for much the same reason: not because he used to act way back when, but because horror fans may remember him for having directed FRIGHT NIGHT. He’s given more or less the John Agar role, and he certainly makes an effort, but he comes across a bit stiff, as if uncomfortable being back in front of the camera.
6a00d8341c630a53ef0133f3710f58970b-600wiTony Todd, having made a cameo in HATCHET, is rewarded with a lead role here. A fine actor who has been poorly used by the horror genre since his memorable debut in CANDYMAN1992), Todd seems to be enjoying himself as Reverend Zombie, but his joy may come at the expense of the film. He throws in a series of exaggerated spook-show hand  gestures, suggesting that the Reverend is a charlatan, yet the scripts seems to want us to take his knowledge of the supernatural as authentic. Todd is also victimized by some awkward dialogue that sound uncharacteristic when coming from a voodoo houngan.

THE REAL PROBLEM

Ultimately, HATCHET II never makes any of its characters into anything interesting enough to hold our attention. For all the back story dumped on us in the first act, the lead characters turn out to be not much more important than the supporting victims; there is little or no dramatic tension, because the connections between characters are too tenuous.
When Trent (R. A. Mihailoff) finally comes to grips with Crowley, the scene should explode on screen, because Crowley is settling a personal score instead of targeting another random victim. (Trent was one of three kids whose Halloween prank resulted in Crowley’s death, from which he returned with a literal vengeance.) But the scene does not exploit this possibility with an exchange of closeups or even a glance of recognition. Nor does HATCHET II play with the fact that, for once, we might root for Crowley.
Instead, the only tension in the scene comes from the fact that Mihailoff played Leatherface in THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE III, a film for which Hodder acted as stunt supervisor. If you know the behind-the-scenes background, then you know why Trent is just about the only character who lays a glove on Crowley: it’s so we can see a cool fight seen between two stunt men, one who played Leatherface and the other who played Jason (Hodder wore the hockey mask in FRIDAY THE 13TH 7 through X). It’s almost a good moment – the only time when Victor Crowley seems to work up a little sweet, even seem almost vulnerable – but the end result is not half what it should have been.
Even more disappointing is the final face-off between Crowley and Reverend Zombie. The later has certainly done enough wrong so that we are happy to see Crowley sights land on him, but there is no strong personal connection. (Zombie, we are told, could have been – but was not – with Trent and his friends on the fateful night of Crowley’s death.) Considering the effort spent on establishing a back story, there should have been something in there to make the confrontation payoff on something that had happened in the past.
Also, it would have helped if Zombie had not been such an idiot – ditching his shot-gun and preferring to go hand-to-hand with Crowley. As with Mihailoff, the motivation here is less the characters than the actors: instead of Leatherface-versus-Jason, we get Candyman-versus-Jason. The script needed to give us some reason to think the Reverend might prevail, something that would put the outcome in doubt – something hat would make us sit up and take notice, instead of sit back and wait for the inevitable demise of another victim.

COUP DE GRACE

Marybeth tries to level Victor Crowley's karma.
Marybeth tries to level Victor Crowley's karma.

It must be said that, for all its failings, HATCHET II ends on a wonderful note, one that works brilliantly by setting up an overused cliche and then overturning it. SPOILER For once, at least, a final girl does what we have always wanted her to do to make sure that her apparently unkillable opponent does not rise one final time before the fadeout. END SPOILER
In a film plagued by sequel cliches, it is nice to see that setting up the next installment in the franchise was not a concern that was allowed to ruin the ending of this film. If there ever is a HATCHET III, one hopes it takes its cue from this moment and tries to do something subversive with the slasher formula, instead of simply offering up more lambs to the slaughter.
HATCHET II (Dark Sky Films, October 1, 2010). Written and directed by Adam Green. Cast: Danielle Harris, Tony Todd, Kane Hodder, Parry Shen, Tom Holland, R.A. Mihailoff, A.J. Bowen, Alexis Peters, Ed Ackerman, David Foy, Rick McCallum, John Carl Buechler, Kathryn Fiore, Mercedes McNab.
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Hatchet II midnight screenings with in-person guests

Hatchet II posterHATCHET II officially opens on Friday, October 1, but just after midnight on Thursday, September 30, horror fans at locations scattered around the country will have an opportunity to see advance screenings. (Technically, the screenings are scheduled for 12:01am, dating them on Friday morning, but for our purposes, let’s think of them as Thursday night.) Additionally, writer-director Adam Green, actress Danielle Harris, and actors Kane Hodder, Tony Todd, and R.A. Hihailoff will appear separately at locations in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Detroit, Tampa, and Orlando.
HATCHET II is being released uncut and unrated, in all its gory glory, on approximately 70 screens. The publicists for distributor Dark Sky are touting this as the largest release on an unrated film in more than 25 years (presumably dating back to 1985’s RE-ANIMATOR).
Read on for a list of personal appearances:
KANE HODDER

TAMPA — 10/1 for midnight showings at 12:01am
AMC Veterans Expressway 24 (9302 Anderson Rd)
ORLANDO – 10/1 for prime evening showing
AMC Pleasure Island 24 (1500 E Buena Vista Dr Lake Buena Vista, FL)
Q&A to follow film

TONY TODD

CHICAGO – 10/1 for midnight showing at 12:01am
AMC Crestwood 18 (13221 Rivercrest Dr, Crestwood, IL)
Q&A to follow film

ADAM GREEN

LOS ANGELES – 10/1 for midnight showing at 12:01am
AMC Universal CityWalk 19 (100 Universal City Plaza)
Q&A to follow film

RA MIHAILOFF

DETROIT – 10/1 for midnight showing at 12:01am
AMC Livonia 20 (19500 Haggerty Rd Livonia, MI)
Q&A to follow film

DANIELLE HARRIS

NEW YORK CITY – 10/1 for midnight showing at 12:01am
AMC Empire 25 (234 W 42nd St)
NEW YORK CITY – 10/1 for prime evening screening
AMC Empire 25 (234 W 42nd St)
Q&A to follow film

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Hatchet: Blu-ray review

click to purchase
click to purchase
Anchor Bay’s new Blu-ray disc replaces their old DVD as the definitive edition for fans who want to add the film to their collection.

HATCHET is back – this time on Blu-ray, and just in time for the release of HATCHET 2, which is set to arrive in theatres on October 1. Writer-director Adam Green’s salute to “Old School American Horror” was previously the subject of an excellent “Unrated Director’s Cut DVD,” loaded with extra features. Anchor Bay’s new Blu-ray disc (release date: September 7) ports over their old bonus material and adds a brand new audio commentary with Green and Kane Hodder, who plays the film’s backwoods legend, Victory Crowley. With the behind-the-scenes details having been thoroughly covered in the DVD, there are few gaps to be filled, but the new commentary is a welcome addition, and the widescreen high-def transfer reminds us just how good this modestly budgeted film looks.
HATCHET is presented in a 1080p transfer of its complete, unrated 84-minute cut, with 1.78 aspect ratio for 16×9 televisions, with the English audio track in Dolby TrueHD 5.1, and with subtitles in Spanish, English for the hearing impaired. Although Adam Green, in the audio commentary, expresses reservations about the high-def transfer (which he apparently feels will reveal flaws in the image), the photography actually looks quite wonderful. The atmosphere of the swamp – as much as over-the-top gore – makes the film work, and this is rendered with beautiful clarity: the night scenes are dark and shadowy, without being murky, and every drop of slow-motion blood gleams like a liquid ruby.
The disc’s sole new feature, the audio commentary with Green and Hodder, mostly eschews details of the film’s production, instead addressing the aftermath: going to festivals, finding distribution, battling the MPAA. Green expresses frustration over HATCHET’s limited theatrical release (marred by weak promotional support and cuts need to achieve an R-rating) but focuses most of his attention on pointing out subtle details that set up HATCHET 2: for example, Victor Crowley’s skin coloring hints at his parentage, which involves a Voodoo curse. Green also recalls that his producer bugged him about whether it was worth the effort to get Tony Todd (CANDYMAN) to play a brief cameo as Reverend Zombie; Green insisted, knowing the character would play a much larger role in the sequel.

Kane Hodder doing a burn stunt as the deformed Victor Crowley
Kane Hodder doing a burn stunt as the deformed Victor Crowley

Overall, this commentary is less jokey and fragmented than the previous one, which was interrupted by technical troubles and suffered from the absence of Hodder. The actor, best known as the stunt man who wore Jason’s mask in FRIDAY THE 13TH PART 7 through X, expresses appreciation for being given an opportunity to play dramatic scenes with out makeup (in flashbacks of Victor Crowley’s father), and he happily notes that he was satisfied with the kills as written in the script (he usually insists on adding his own twists).
Unlike Anchor Bay’s recent Limited Edition Blu-ray of THE EVIL DEAD (which was missing some bonus material from its previous Ultimate Edition DVD), the HATCHET Blu-ray includes all the previously available features. These include:

  • Audio Commentary with Co-Producer-Writer-Director Adam Green, Co-Producer-Cinematographer Will Barratt and Actors Tamara Feldman, Joel David Moore and Deon
  • The Making of Hatchet
  • Meeting Victor Crowley: An in-depth look at the creation of a new horror icon
  • Guts & Gore: Go behind the scenes of Hatchet’s special makeup and prosthetic effects
  • Anatomy of a Kill: Witness the “jaw-breaking” birth, design and execution of a death scene
  • A Twisted Tale: Writer/Director Adam Green recounts his decades-long friendship with “Twisted Sister” front man Dee Snider
  • Gag Reel
  • Theatrical Trailer

The featurettes are presented in 1.33, standard def. For more details, read our review of the DVD here.
With its good-looking high-def transfer, new audio commentary, and inclusion of all the old bonus material, Anchor Bay’s Blu-ray disc becomes the definitive version for fans who have yet to add HATCHET to their collections. Those who already own the DVD may think twice about whether the new commentary is worth the price of a second purchase, but the improved picture and sound quality enhance the horrors in a way that brings the viewing experience to life even more vividly than before.
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Hatchet coming to Blu-ray

hatchet bd
click to pre-order

HATCHET (2006) – writer-director Adam Green’s gleefully gory homage to slasher films of the 1970s and ’80s – is coming to Blu-ray on September 7. The new disc will feature the unrated director’s cut, not the R-rated cut released briefly in theatres in 2007. Bonus features from the previous DVD release (reviewed here) will be ported over, and add a new audio commentary will be added, featuring Green and actor-stuntman Kane Hodder, who plays the unstoppable menace Victor Crowley.
More info below:

Street Date: September 7, 2010
Pre-book: August 11, 2010
Cat. #: BD21841
UPC: 0 1313 21841-9 7
Run Time: 84 Minutes
Rating: Unrated
SRP: $29.99
Format: 1.78:1 / 16×9 1080p
Audio: Dolby TrueHD 5.1
Subtitles: Spanish, English SDH
Bonus Features:

  • NEW Audio Commentary with Co-Producer/Writer/Director Adam Green and Star Kane Hodder
  • Audio Commentary with Co-Producer/Writer/Director Adam Green, Co-Producer/Cinematographer Will Barratt and Actors Tamara Feldman, Joel David Moore and Deon
  • The Making of Hatchet
  • Meeting Victor Crowley: An in-depth look at the creation of a new horror icon
  • Guts & Gore: Go behind the scenes of Hatchet’s special makeup and prosthetic effects
  • Anatomy of a Kill: Witness the “jaw-breaking” birth, design and execution of a death scene
  • A Twisted Tale: Writer/Director Adam Green recounts his decades-long friendship with “Twisted Sister” front man Dee Snider
  • Gag Reel
  • Theatrical Trailer

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B.T.K. – Horror Film Review

Recently released on region one DVD, Michael Feifer’s B.T.K. describes itself as ‘a fictional film based on a real character’. That character is the serial killer Dennis L. Rader, who was arrested in March 2005 for the murder of ten people, in a killing spree that spanned two decades. Rader was known as “B.T.K.” because of his penchant for binding, torturing and then killing his victims. He was perceived by those who knew him, as an ordinary, law abiding, family man. He was President of the Congregation Council at his church and Cub Scout leader. Married, with two daughters, no one suspected he had another, more sinister side.
B.T.K. does not tell us the story from the beginning, but picks up after Rader has been killing for many years already. The film shows us how, whilst working as a compliance officer (the perfect job for such a control freak), Rader chooses his victims by accusing them of minor offenses and seeing how they react. Those who argue don’t live long enough to regret it: Rader goes back to their house later and kills them. He gets his sexual kicks by watching them suffer, seeing the horror in their eyes as he suffocates or strangles them. There are a few gruesome moments, but the sheer terror of these doesn’t come across because of the unrealistic reactions of the victims.
I was curious to see how Kane Hodder, most famous for his role as Jason Vorhees in some of the FRIDAY THE 13th movies, would fare without his hockey mask. There is no doubt he can pull off a machete wielding, maniac; unfortunately, as Rader, his performance is average at best. Luckily for him, alongside Amy Lindon as Rader’s wife Susan, he almost looks good!
B.T.K. does not tell us much about what makes Rader tick. Feifer does make the odd clumsy attempt to put us in the picture, such as when Rader tells his victim about his urges and explains why he feels the need to do what he does, but it is patently apparent that this is the only way Feifer could get his message to us, and it feels as if he cheated by writing it in such a blatant way. In fact the screenwriting is below par throughout the film, which is surprising since this isn’t Feifer’s first serial killer film.
Feifer’s direction can only be described as average. There are moments that should have supplied the jump-scares; however, there is no build up of tension, and the musical score is weak, adding nothing to the atmosphere, so these potential moments pass by, unnoticed.
This is such a shame, because B.T.K. could have been a very frightening film. The story has potential. There’s nothing scarier than an average guy, living an ordinary life, who in his spare time tortures and brutally kills, before going home to his family and carrying on as if nothing has happened. Unfortunately, the story is not well told, and as a result the film is awasted opportunity.
NOTE: This film is not to be confused with B.T.K. KILLER, which was also released by Lionsgate Home Entertainment.
Lionsgate Home Entertainment’s website lists no special features for its Region 1 DVD (released in the U.S. on May 12). The Region 2 disc features an Audio Commentary with Director Michael Feifer and Actor Kane Hodder, and a Behind The Scenes featurette.
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Hatchet (2006)

A tour of the swamp turns to terror in the horror homage HATCHET.

Slasher homage exceeds originals

This may be the bucket of blood that splatter fans were eagerly anticipating (those for whom FRIDAY THE 13TH is a fond memory), but it is also an excellent horror film with solid scripting and strong performances that make it appealing to a wider audience.
The movie is an unapologetic throwback to 1980s slasher films, with numerous tips of the hats to its progenitors. Robert Englund (best known as dream demon Freddy Kruger) has a cameo as an early victim; Tony Todd (best known as Candyman) puts in a brief, comical appearance; makeup man John Carl Buechler (FROM BEYOND) provides the carnage and appears on-screen as the obligatory prophet of doom, a drunken old loon warning the tourists that death awaits them in the swamp. Finally, Kane Hodder (best known as masked killer Jason Voorhees) plays the mad, mutant, and possibly supernatural psycho-killer.
Which is completely appropriate because HATCHET, like FRIDAY THE 13TH, is about some teen-agers stalked by a mad killer in the woods. The story follows a group of friends on vacation who decided to take a night-time boat tour; unfortunately, the boat runs aground, stranding them in the middle of territory presided over – or so legend has it – by the deformed off-spring of a lonely cabin-dweller who was killed by a Halloween prank gone wrong.
Set in the Louisiana bayou, the film has atmosphere to spare, and even the obligatory legend explaining the killer’s existence is presented with panache. The suggestion of supernatural overtones (the killer is supposed to have died in the fire that killed his father), along with the creepiness of the location, creates an ambience wherein the existence of an apparently unstoppable killer seems complete convincing – not just an obligatory genre convention.


HATCHET far exceeds its inspiration models, thanks to convincing execution by writer-director Adam Greenberg, who makes the gore scenes really hurt. Working with a convincing cast of characters – none of whom deserves their fate – he creates a wonderfully aggressive horror show filled with equal parts suspense and shock. Viewers won’t find themselves bored between atrocities, eagerly awaiting the next geyser of gore to break the tedium; even jaded gore hounds may find themselves squirming in dreadful anticipation of what will happen next. The film’s violence is unapologetically unrestrained; in fact, the film is almost too effective, becoming frightening rather than fun as the hapless tourists are picked off one by one in hideously graphic fashion: decapitation by shovel, a power saw to the face, and arms ripped out of their sockets, etc.
If there is any obvious flaw to HATCHET, it lies in perhaps too close an adherence to its role models, which inevitably served up obligatory “surprise” endings that left doors open for sequels. After exceeding expectations with its sense of credible story-telling, it’s a bit disappointing to see HATCHET surrender to mechanical genre conventions. The ending plays like a sop thrown to the hard-core horror hounds who don’t give a damn about character or story so long as there’s shock aplenty on view. The shock certainly works, but it yanks you out of the realm of verisimilitude, where you are genuinely frightened, and tosses you back into the movie-movie world, where you hoot and holler like someone enjoying a ride on a roller-coaster. The thrill’s still there, but it lacks the genuinely disturbing touch of something like THE DESCENT.

TRIVIA

Victor Crowley confronts a tourist in the bayou.The film earned a reputation as a crowd-pleasing horror fave on the festival circuit in 2006. At its final festival screening, at Screamfest in Hollywood, October 2006, writer-director Adam Green told the eager audience. “Since we first showed it in March, this print has been all around the world, and I’ve been with it. Right now, I feel about like the print looks.” He pumped up the audience by adding, “Our best response has been in London, because those fuckers are crazy, but since this is the end of the tour and we’re back home, I think you can beat them. Let’s rip the roof off this place!” That was the first – but not the last -time that the audience erupted into applause.
The poster art for the film’s festival tour proudly proclaimed that HATCHET is “old school horror” (circa 1980): “It’s not a sequel. It’s not a remake. And it’s not based on a Japanese one.”  Truer words were never spoken.
After is festival run, HATCHET was picked up for home video distribution by Anchor Bay Entertainment, a company known for their excellent limited edition DVDs devoted to cult horror movies. The company opted to schedule for film for a platform theatrical release in 2007. The MPAA is likely to demand some major cuts in exchange for an R-rating. The film is strong enough to withstand the censors scissors without losing too much of its effectiveness.
SPOILER ALRERT: HATCHET drops a few subtle hints that lay the seeds for future sequels. In the flashback of the Halloween trick-or-treat gone wrong, the camera lingers on the masked face of one of the pranksters, without revealing his identity – which will probably be revealed in any follow-up. Most likely, he will turn out to be the alligator hunter, played by Robert Englund, who is an early victim in the film, making his death not one of random violence but of revenge.
HATCHET (2006). Written & directed by Adam Green. Cast: Joel David Moore, Tamara Feldman, Deon Richmond, Mercedes McNab, Kane Hodder, Parry Shen, Joleigh Fioreavanti, Joel Murray, Richard Riehle, Patrika Darbo, Robert Englund, Joshua Leonard, Tony Todd, John Carl Buechler
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