The Purge: Anarchy – Podcast 5:27

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The Cinefantastique Spotlight Podcast, Volume 5, Number 27 explores the dystopian horrors of THE PURGE: ANARCHY. This sequel takes the premise of THE PURGE (2013) and plays it out on a larger canvas, exploring territory that the original only suggested. Is that enough to satisfy those frustrated by THE PURGE’s home invasion scenario? Listen in to find out, as podcasters Lawrence French and Steve Biodrowski debate the merits of debate the merits of vicariously purging your anti-social tendencies by watching this moviefrom Blumhouse Productions and Michael Bay’s Platinum Dunes.

Ridley Scott Onboard 'Blade Runner' Redux

bladerunner_2According to Deadline,  Ridley Scott, currently filming the ALIEN “prequel” (or is it?) PROMETHEUS, has agreed to produce and direct a BLADE RUNNER film with Alcon Entertainment.
 Alcon’s  Broderick Johnson and Andrew Kosove, who acquired the film rights earlier this year. It’s unclear if the film will be a prequel or sequel to  the property, based on Philip K. Dick’s  1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Scott helmed the original 1982 BLADE RUNNER, set in a dystopian version of 2019. It had many differences from the source text;  Scott’s vision was of a steamy, overpopulated LA, Dick’s a greatly de-populated, radioactive dust-laden San Fransisco.  
Though starring Harrison Ford (still with the STAR WARS buzz, but before gaining major star status ), and sporting an richly detailed visual mise-en-scène, the film was not a big success in theaters.
In later years, on re-examination through TV and video veiwings, it began to grow in status. A Director’s Cut and a later 25th Anniversary DVD re-master overssen by Ridley Scott led to BLADE RUNNER’s reappraisal as significant science fiction thriller with a distinctive retro-future Film Noir style.
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A Clockwork Orange (1971) – A Retrospective

a-clockwork_orange-posterMalcolm McDowell discusses Kubrick’s scathing film version of the Anthony Burgess novel.

Producer-director Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of the Anthony Burgess novel is a strangely overwhelming experience–at time contemptible, and yet always valid in its sardonic outlook. We`re forced to identify with a young, violent droog, Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell) as he rapes, brutalizes, and murders; after an experimental treatment conditions him to become violently ill at the mere thought of sex or violence, his karma is leveled as, one by one, those he wronged have their chance at revenge. The sick joke of the movie is that everyone else, indeed the very state itself, is as morally corrupt as our `friend and humble narrator.` Burgess`s point was that destroying someone`s free will, his ability to make moral choices, was as immoral as anything Alex did; in the novel (at least in England, where its last chapter was not shorn off), Alex eventually outgrows his youthful penchant for violence and finds himself aware of a desire to settle down. For Kubrick, life moves in cycles, endlessly repeating; thus the film ends with Alex returned to his previous state, presumably ready to embark on another spree as soon as he`s released from hospital (`I was cured all right`). A cynical film, without redeeming characters, and yet it makes its point. Read More